Tag Archives: trust

Beware of Ransomware!!

The term “ransom” has been around for hundreds of years and is best described as a way to redeem someone from captivity, bondage, detention, etc., by paying a demanded price.

Today, we have another destructive variation of the word ransom — that is “ransomware.” What is it and what can we do about it?

TechRepublic recently produced Ransomware: The Smart Person’s Guide, written by James Sanders. This is an executive summary quoted from the guide:

  • What is it? Ransomware is malware. The hackers demand payment, often via Bitcoin or prepaid credit card, from victims in order to regain access to an infected device and the data stored on it.
  • Why does it matter? Because of the ease of deploying ransomware, criminal organizations are increasingly relying on such attacks to generate profits.
  • Who does this affect? While home users have traditionally been the targets, healthcare and the public sector have been targeted with increasing frequency. Enterprises are more likely to have deep pockets from which to extract a ransom.
  • When is this happening? Ransomware has been an active and ongoing threat since September 2013.
  • How do I protect myself from a ransomware attack? A variety of tools developed in collaboration with law enforcement and security firms are available to decrypt your computer.

Sanders adds: “For those who have been infected, the No More Ransom project — a collaboration between Europol, the Dutch National Police, Kaspersky Lab, and Intel Security — provides decryption tools for many widespread ransomware types.

Here are a couple of informative infographics by LogRhythm:


How to Be More Self-Confident and Motivated

Click the image below to download the FREE book Personal Confidence & Motivation from MTD Training. [Note: A simple login is required. Select working as your option.]

“Do you have the self-belief and confidence to make a difference? Do you ‘just know’ that you’ll succeed no matter what? Do you know what motivates and gets you going? And do you know how to tap into the motivations of other people? In this book, you’ll find the answers to all of these questions and much more besides! You’ll understand how to build your own confidence levels and how to generate confidence in an instant. You’ll then move onto the topic of motivation and you’ll be able to really understand this area of personal development.”

 

 

How Impatient Are We in Checkout Lines?

We are an impatient society and expect that our time be respected. Thus, many shoppers get impatient if the lines in a retail store are too long. Sometimes, they even leave the store without buying.

What should store-based retailers understand about consumers’ attitudes and behavior about waiting in line? According to Wavetec (a firm that offers B2B solutions from queue management systems, to digital signage, customer feedback systems, service area design, and financial displays):

“Every day, millions of customers wait in line, from driving to work to checking out at a retail store. True reality about waiting lines — pervasive and unavoidable! Given the dynamism of business and competition today, a waiting customer is potentially a lost customer. The following infographic takes you through the anatomy of queues, how customers perceive and react to queues, and how you can deal with them efficiently to deliver optimum customer experiences.”

 

 

Are You Trapped in a Bad Career? Here Are Tips!

We all aspire to great careers — with jobs that we find fulfilling, that have cooperative workmates, that have bosses who respect us and our abilities, that have the potential for upward mobility, and that compensate us fairly.

So, happens when our career goals are not being fulfilled?

Here are some observations from By J.T. O’Donnell, Founder and CEO, CareerHMO.com — writing for Inc.:

Step 1: Get clear on your pivot. You need to choose a new career direction based on the facts. What problems do you want to solve? What skills do you want to leverage? How do you want to provide value to an employer?  The more specific you can be about your new career direction, the easier it will be to connect the dots and get a new job doing what you want.” [Click the preceding link to access a free quiz.]

Step 2: Create an ‘interview bucket list.’ A targeted, proactive job search always produces better results. When you identify the companies you would most like to work for, you can build a job search plan that lets you work smarter.” [Click the preceding link to access interview bucket list tips.]

Step 3: Make new career friends. It still holds true that 80 percent of all jobs are obtained via referral. If you are changing careers, you need to meet people who are working for the companies on your interview bucket list.”

Step 4: Seek a ‘lily pad’ job. Getting a job at a company that has the kind of career opportunities you want to move into might start with you doing something for them that leverages the skills you gained in the career you’re trying to get out of. Once you’ve got your foot in the door, you can use your professional savvy to impress the employer into giving you a shot at doing what you really want to do.”

 
Click the image to read tips from O’Donnell regarding each of the above steps.

CREDIT: Getty Images

 

We Should ALL Be Welcome Here!

The American Express OPEN Forum has produced a valuable video, All Are Welcome Here,  based on the acceptance of diversity:

“More than 10,000 small business owners around the country are sending a message. They want their communities to know that all customers are welcome to walk through their doors regardless of religion, country of origin, or immigration status. Amanda Ballantyne of the Main Street Alliance and Elana and Danny Schwartzman, the owners of the Common Roots Café in Minneapolis, tell us about the ‘All Are Welcome Here’ campaign.”
 

 
Here is the headline of a poster prepared by the Main Street Alliance.


 

Avoid These Mistakes When Doing Business in China

Selling goods and services to companies and consumers in China is not an easy task for foreign firms. Here are some mistakes to avoid.

Based on an interview with Frank Lavin, CEO of Export Now, a company that assists Western businesses that enter the Chinese market, Darren Dahl (writing for American Express Open Forum), describes six mistakes that foreign companies should not make:

 

  1. Doing Nothing New — “The most common mistake companies make when entering international markets is that they don’t do anything new, says Lavin. ‘They think that whatever works domestically will also work internationally,’ he says. ‘They don’t look at pricing or brand positioning or the competitive map. There will be gaps and you need to do some analysis to close them.'”
  2. Not Embracing E-Commerce — “Lavin says that while the U.S. has a mature brick-and-mortar merchandising system that’s been around for two hundred years, Chinese customers primarily shop online. ‘E-commerce is often the icing on the cake in the U.S.,’ says Lavin. ‘But in China, e-commerce is the cake.'”
  3. Failing to Market Differently — “Lavin says getting your products there is only the first step. ‘What we like to say is that distribution ain’t marketing,’ he says. ‘You’ve reached the starting line, not the finish line. Companies must realize that when they’re entering a new market like China, they are essentially starting over when it comes to building up brand awareness and goodwill among potential customers.”
  4. Trying to Do It All Yourself — “If you’ve made the decision to sell in China, then you should also be willing to partner with other businesses to make that move a success.”
  5. Obsessing Over Currency Fluctuations — “One thing you don’t have to worry too much about when selling in China is the fluctuation of global currencies. Lavin says that if you’re selling less than $3,000 worth of goods a day or less, you can simply make minor price adjustments to your products as needed without worrying about any kind of currency hedge strategy. Then again, if you are selling upwards of $50 million worth of goods a year, you might want to think about putting such a plan in place.”
  6. Starting Too Fast — “Lavin suggests that every company start with what he calls a soft launch, where you begin selling a fraction of the products you might otherwise be doing in the U.S. as a way to work the kinks out of everything from the warehouse.”

 

Click the image to read more.

 

How Well Are World Leaders Paid?

We know that senior business executives, popular celebrities, and star athletes make a lot of money. But, how do world leaders rank in terms of their compensation? And what do YOU think about this?

Here are 20 highly-paid world leaders according to 24/7 Wall St., as reported by Thomas C. Frohlich:

“In many countries, politicians frequently make more than the average citizen. This is especially true of countries’ leaders. While the size of a president’s or prime minister’s paycheck varies considerably between countries, world leaders are on the whole paid very well.”

“Though leaders’ salaries do not align perfectly with their countries’ GDP per capita, there is an interesting trend. In Singapore, which trails only Luxembourg in wealth, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong earns about $1.8 million yearly and is by far the highest paid leader. However, in Iceland, which is among the least wealthy nations of the 20 considered, Prime Minister Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson has the lowest annual salary ($133,729) of the 20 leaders.”

 
Following are the annual salaries of the twenty leaders as per 24/7 Wall Street.

  1. Lee Hsien Loong, Singapore, $1.8 million
  2. Leung Chun-ying, Hon Kong, $576,000
  3. Johann N. Schneider-Ammann, Switzerland, $460,000
  4. Barack Obama, United States, $400,000
  5. Malcolm Turnbull, Australia, $396,000
  6. Werner Faymann, Austria, $343,000
  7. Xavier Bettel, Luxembourg, $255,000
  8. Justin Trudeau, Canada, $253,000
  9. Angela Merkel, Germany, $244,000
  10. Charles Michel, Belgium, $239,000
  11. Stefan Lofven, Sweden, $235,000
  12. Lars Lokke Rasmussen, Denmark, $222,000
  13. Enda Kenny, Ireland, $209,000
  14. David Cameron, United Kingdom, $206,000
  15. Mark Rutte, Netherlands, $204,000
  16. Shinzo Abe, Japan, $203,000
  17. Francois Hollande, France, $202,000
  18. Erna Solberg, Norway, $187,000
  19. Juha Sipila, Finland, $159,000
  20. Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson, Iceland, $134,000