Tag Archives: job search

Be a Star in Your Job Search

You probably know that first impressions matter; that’s why you learned to look people in the eye and firmly shake their hands. But the art of successfully interviewing for a job is probably not something that you discussed over the dinner table. Just because you got in the door to interview for a job opportunity and put on a suit doesn’t mean that you’re a shoo-in for a job. There’s an art to a successful interview. Unfortunately, not knowing what to do during this crucial time make the difference in landing the job of your dreams.

Perhaps you know some of what it takes to successfully interview. You’ve likely done a little research on the company—but have you plotted out how you’re going to get to the location? How about questions: Sure, you might meet a human resources contact, but do you have the names of every other person who will be in the room? It never hurts to think through, practice, and make all the right steps in a job interview, and this graphic by Aiken Cloud can help.
 

 

A Graduating Zarb Student Gives Job Search Insights

Guest Blogger

Alyson Guarino, Hofstra University

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In a detailed commentary about the post “Are You Ready for a Months-Long Job Interview?”, Alyson Guarino, a graduating Zarb School of Business BBA student [and President of the Student Government Association at Hofstra] wrote the following about her job search. There are many lessons for job and internship seekers here.

After interviewing with three big firms, I can speak to the experience of having “months-long” job interviews. The interview process technically started in February 2015 when I began networking with company recruiters and current employees. In May 2015, I made sure to reach out to all of the firms that I was interested in joining, with the understanding that the hiring process began in mid-August.

In October 2015, I was selected to move forward in the interviewing process. The first round of interviews for two of the three firms were phone interviews with partners of the firm where I was interviewed on leadership, and various technical case studies. The third firm interviewed me in person and I sat with a recruiter, not a partner.

The next rounds of interviews were in person with multiple partners of the firm, and were also focused mostly around case studies, strategic thinking, and problem solving. The last round of interviews included daylong events where I was introduced to the different teams I would potentially be working with, and different partners of the firm. Offers from all three firms were extended to me in early November, and they required a response by early December.

After the offer is extended, [I learned that] the interview process is still not over because the potential employee can still have questions about the firm and want to interview the firm further. The entire process for me was 9 months, but the actual interviewing process was in fact months long.

The hiring process is a complicated and long process and when someone is seeking a job, managing the multiple interviews with various firms can seem like a full time job in itself!

Even before I began seeking full-time jobs for post graduation, I applied for internships for every winter break and summer session from 2012-2016 and each time I went through a separate hiring process.

The hiring process generally includes multiple interviews (phone and in person) as well as background checks, and drug tests. It can take a long time to hear back, but I think sending follow-up messages after the interview to thank them for their time makes it easier to follow up 2 weeks later if you have not heard anything.

The most important thing at the end of an interview that I ask is when can I expect to hear back? The most general answer is, “within 2-3 weeks”. The firms are typically in the middle of interviewing other potential candidates as well, so they need the time to decide who would be the best fit. The process can be longer for someone who was not the first choice.

After the offers were extended to me from the firms mentioned above, I had a certain amount of time to respond and if I declined the offer – they then had the chance to reach out to another potential candidate to provide an offer to them. However, they cannot receive an offer until I decline one. That means that person is waiting even longer to hear back.

The entire process can be exhausting, but can also be very rewarding. Interviewing can get easier and easier, and the entire process can actually begin to feel like second nature. I recommend staying organized and finding a way to manage all communication with the various companies that you have applied to (including correspondence, names and dates). It will come in handy when a recruiter or firm finally reaches out to you weeks later with a response, and you’re not exactly sure which company is calling. Stay organized, and enjoy the process!

Alyson, thanks for sharing and good luck in your job!


 

Today’s Job Search Becoming More Frustrating

We know that the job hiring process is much tougher today than in the past — due to companies’ use of key-word computer software to pre-screen resumes, the downsizing of several major companies, and the number of applicants for each good job. But, another disheartening trend for job seekers is the longer hiring process used by many firms. Job seekers must be ready to deal with these trends without getting overly frustrated by them. A positive attitude, and endurance, are essential.

For example, in today’s print version of the Wall Street Journal, Sue Shellenbarger’s report is titled “The Six-Month Job Interview”:

“It has never been easy to land a job, but a rise in hiring has added a new twist: Employers are taking nearly twice as long to hire people as they did several years ago. ​Companies need an average of 23 days to screen and hire new employees, up from 13 days in 2010, says Andrew Chamberlain, chief economist at the jobs and recruiting site Glassdoor, based on a study of nearly 350,000 interview reviews by the site’s users. Applicants run a gantlet of multiple interviews not only with bosses but with teams of prospective co-workers. Also, more people are being asked to submit business plans or face a battery of personnel tests.”[Click here to access the full Glassdoor report.]

“For job seekers, performing well during decision-making marathons requires a thick skin and new skills. Some get frustrated or blame themselves for delays in the hiring process. ‘It can be debilitating. It goes on and on,’ says Carole Osterer, Wayland, Mass., who completed a job search late last year. A human-resources manager at one employer called her with glowing comments. A month later, he called to say the company wasn’t interested after all. After another month, he reversed himself again and asked her to interview, says Ms. Osterer, a university research administrator. She did the interviews but never heard from the employer again.”

 

To read more about the elongated job search process (and see more tips like those below), click the image.

HURDLE: A prospective employer asks you to research and present a full-blown business plan. DO: Target your presentation to demonstrate the specific skills and abilities the employer wants to see. DON’T: Hand interviewers a written report including your most valuable business contacts and intelligence.” ILLUSTRATION: TIM BOWER FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

A CareerHMO Video Series for Seasoned Workers’ Job Search

CareerHMO is a career development firm. It offers a number of free resources, as well as paid career coaching. It not only offers advice for  those just embarking on a career after college, it also serves those with a lot of job experience.

For example, it provides a FREE nine-video series called “ 9 Ways Seasoned Workers Can Improve Their Job Search”:

#1 – Change The Way You Look At Yourself

#2 – Ditch Outdated Job Search Tactics

#3 – What “Overqualified” Really Means

#4 – Sharpen Your Brand

#5 – Promote Your Brand Online

#6 -Tell Great Stories

#7 – Working with the Younger Generation

#8 – Consider Self Employment

#9 – Managing Salary Expectations

 
Click the image below to access these videos.


 

Looking for a New Job? Consider These Questions

Do you ask yourself several relevant questions BEFORE starting a job search? You should. We’ve written about this before as part of our personal SWOT analysis.

Consider these observations from Tai Goodwin, writing for Careerealism:

“The perfect time to start your job search is before you begin feeling a desperate need to get out of your current position. One of the worst times to start a job search is when you feel like your back is up against the wall.”

“Deciding to search for a new job, regardless of the labor market, can be both exciting and frightening. There’s excitement in thinking about new possibilities for your career and work-life. But thinking about the time, energy, and potential rejection involved in the job search process can be overwhelming.”

“For those who decide that finding a new job is well worth the challenges a job search will bring, a larger question looms: How can I be sure my next job will be any better than my last one?”

Click the image to read more and see 5 questions to consider BEFORE a job search.
 

 

Are YOU Doing What Employers Are Looking for During the Job Search?

Are you doing all that you can to excite potential employers?

As Tracey Parsons, CEO of CredHive (a job-credentialing firm), writes for Careerealism, there are several things that employers seek in candidates:

  • Follow instructions — “At my company, we require you to join our database. We only use our own tool to identify talent for our open positions. We don’t take resumes. We don’t believe them. But, that’s our requirement. So, when people do what we’ve asked, we are happy. We look at their work samples and try to find the best hire based on what they’ve done.”
  • Use focused communications — “When you focus your communication on solving business problems, I love you for it. I can imagine you doing the job right away, because you get it.”
  • Show that you understand the company — “This tells me three things: First, you took the time to read our site and understand our personality. Second, you understand our brand enough that the learning curve when you start isn’t steep. See, I can already see you working here when you write in our voice. And finally, it tells me that you also see alignment.”
  • Show examples“Nothing beats examples! Examples are awesome and help you stand out. If you have a portfolio, Slideshare, CredHive, links to documents, spreadsheets, reports, project plans, ideas, and presentations from Dropbox, send them.”
  • Ask intelligent questions — “You should be curious about our company, its trajectory, my management style, and the team. You need to ask good questions to help yourself make a well-informed decision. When you ask good questions, I can tell you are curious and that you are thoughtful.”
  • Do a good job of following up— “Nothing seals the deal like a smartly crafted follow-up message. First, there’s the follow up thank you note. I have to admit as digital as I am, I do like a nice hand-written note. But, the E-mail type is also a really nice thing. The net, always send a thank you note.”

Click here to read more.

 

Are YOU Out of Date in Your Job Search Strategy?

We’ve talked a lot about careers and professional development on this blog. One theme that is important to keep in mind is that career development strategies must adapt to the times. Companies have adopted many new techniques. And so must you!!

Ariella Coombs, writing for Careerealism, presents a good short quiz on “Is Your Job Search Strategy OUTDATED?” You should really take this quiz, see how you do, and adapt your approach as suggested in the video tips from CareerHMO.com.

[Note: The link on the last page of the quiz leads to a free series of video tips from CareerHMO.com. There is an E-mail sign up and you do not have to buy anything to view the videos through the quiz link. Each video is about 1.5 to 2 minutes.] To bypass the E-mail sign up, click here to access the video tips directly.