Tag Archives: Facebook

Zarb Students Honored Again!!

Our undergraduate students participated in the 2015-2016 Marketing EDGE Collegiate ECHO Challenge by Facebook and were announced one of the winners of the competition. In particular, Hofstra won the “2nd Place Silver.” There were more than 225 entries in this year’s worldwide competition, which were judged by 58 seasoned professionals across the marketing industry at companies such as Domino’s Pizza, Ernst & Young, Fidelity Investments, The Fossil Group, GlaxoSmithKline, Guthy/Renker, Thomson Reuters, Worldvision International, and more. From among 30 semifinalists, Facebook’s judges made the final determinations for 1st Place Gold, 2nd Place Silver, 3rd Place Bronze, and Honorable Mentions.

This year’s marketing challenge centered on the social media network Facebook. Each team was asked to create an integrated marketing campaign/plan  with the goal of increasing the awareness and consideration of Custom Audiences. This year, Facebook was proud to partner with Marketing EDGE to sponsor this year’s ECHO Challenge.

The Zarb Student Silver Winners of the Marketing EDGE 2016 Collegiate ECHO Marketing Challenge are: Elaina Levenson, Jordan Richmond, Dolly Schuttinger, and Julia Rondeau. Faculty Advisor: Professor Songpol Kulviwat, Department of Marketing & International Business.

With this award, our Hofstra students on the Silver-winning team split a cash prize $1,000. In addition, Marketing EDGE awarded $2,500 in scholarships to Hofstra University’s Department of Marketing and International Business.

Please join us in congratulating the above students for their outstanding works and won the second place “Silver” this year.

Here is our winning commercial:

Note: The Marketing EDGE is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to Educate, Develop, Grow, and Employ college students in the field of marketing. The organization is the only national nonprofit solely committed to affecting the lives of thousands of students and shaping the marketing industry of the future as diverse, inclusive, and highly skilled. (www.facebook.com/marketingEDGEorg)

Business Takes a Liking to Chatbots

The chatbot is an interesting application in our high-tech world.

Because chatbots have been gaining in popularity, it is important for us to know what exactly is a chatbot and what does it do? According to Scott Carey, writing for Techworld:

“Before chatbots, there were just bots — based on software designed to automate a specific task. A chatbot is built on the same premise; however, it delivers this task around a single function, namely chat, or simulated conversation. A chatbot uses machine learning to pick up on conversational cadences, allowing it to effectively mimic human conversation and react to spoken or written prompts to deliver a service.”

“The chatbot is essentially a user interface which can be plugged into a number of data sources via APIs [application program interfaces] so it can deliver information or services on demand, such as weather forecasts or breaking news.”

As further discussed by Knowledge@Wharton:

“While chatbots have been around in various rudimentary forms for years — think of Clippy, Microsoft’s paper clip virtual assistant — they have been taking off lately as advances in machine learning and artificial intelligence make them more versatile than ever. Among the most well-known chatbots: Apple’s Siri.”

“In rapid succession over the past few months, Microsoft, Facebook, and Google have each unveiled their chatbot strategies, touting the potential for this evolving technology to aid users and corporate America with its customer-service capabilities as well as business utility features like organizing a meeting. Yahoo joined the bandwagon recently, launching its first chatbots on a chat app called Kik Messenger.”

 
Click the image to read more from Knowledge@Wharton.


 

Facebook Cracking Down on Third-Party Access to Data

There have been a lot of calls by government agencies, consumer groups, and individual users for Facebook to better control the information it provides to third parties. Now, it is taking another step.

As reported by  Deepa Seetharaman and Elizabeth Dwoskin for the  Wall Street Journal:

“Facebook’s restrictions on its user data, which were announced last year and put into effect in May, are rippling through academia, business, and presidential politics. Dozens of startups that had been using Facebook data have shut down, been acquired, or overhauled their businesses. Political consultants are racing to find new ways to tap voters’ social connections ahead of the 2016 presidential election.”

“’Facebook giveth and Facebook taketh away,’ said Nick Soman, who collected the locations of Facebook users’ friends to enhance his anonymous-chat app, Reveal. He later sold the app to music service Rhapsody International Inc. Mr. Soman said he admires Facebook, but learned a lesson about relying on third parties for a key component of his app.”

 
Click the chart to read more.

American Firms Must Be Careful Doing Business In Europe

For quite a while, the European Commission has been rather tough in regulating large  American companies doing business in Europe and penalizing them when their practices are deemed unacceptable — sometimes, billions of dollars in fines as well as changes in business activities.

As Kelly Couturier  recently noted for the New York Times: ” The biggest American tech companies face intensifying scrutiny by European regulators — pressure that could potentially curb their sizable profits in the region and affect how they operate around the world.”

Here are some examples from Couturier:

  • AmazonAntitrust: “The European Commission opened an investigation in June 2015 into whether the company used its dominant position in the region’s E-books market to make it harder for rivals to offer lower prices.” Taxation: “The European Union released a preliminary finding in January 2015 that a tax deal between Amazon and Luxembourg appears to amount to unfair state aid that may have enabled the company to underpay its taxes.”
  • Apple Antitrust: “European competition officials confirmed in April 2015 that they had sent questionnaires to music labels and rival music streaming companies to gather evidence and decide whether to open an antitrust investigation into Apple’s new music service.” Taxation: “Officials opened an investigation in June 2014 into whether Ireland gave preferential tax treatment to Apple.
  • Facebook Data privacy: “French, Italian, and Spanish privacy officials announced in early April 2015 they had opened investigations into the social network’s privacy policies; similar inquiries have already been started by Dutch, Belgian, and German officials. The regulators are asking whether Facebook gained sufficient approval from users when the company gained access to their online data.”
  • Google Antitrust: “In April, the European Union’s antitrust chief, Margrethe Vestager, formally charged the company of abusing its dominance in Web searches, accusing it of diverting traffic from its rivals to favor its own products and services, particularly Web sites for shopping.” Right to Be Forgotten: “Europe’s highest court ruled in May 2014 that citizens have a so-called right to be forgotten, and that search engines, including Google, must honor some requests from users to delete links to personal information.”
  • Microsoft Antitrust: “In a long-running antitrust case involving Microsoft’s software and interoperability, the company paid almost €2 billion in European fines over a decade, including a penalty in 2013 for failing to adhere to an earlier settlement.”Right to Be Forgotten: Microsoft, which operates the Bing search service, signaled in July 2014 that it planned to follow the lead of Google, by creating an online form that lets individuals request removal of links to material they say violates their online privacy.”

 
Click the image to read Couturier’s full article.

Shown here: An Apple store in Berlin. Credit Adam Berry/Getty Images for Apple

 

Companies Need to Know: Is This End of the Facebook Free-For-All?

Facebook now derives several billions a year from its advertising fees to companies. But the rules keep changing. Are you prepared for what’s next?

According to Dayna Rothman, writing for Marketo:

“Ah Facebook, you never know what’s coming next! Facebook continues to change their newsfeed algorithm, making it increasingly difficult for brands to reach their fans through organic posts, forcing marketers to rethink their approach to social media. With many of the new Facebook updates and focus on user privacy and preference, organic reach continues to fall short. If you are a large brand only 2-8% of fans actually see your posts and only .073% of brands’ fans actually interact with these posts! Facebook says that these changes are in the interest of keeping users happy, but at the same time, Facebook’s ad revenue continues to climb — are paid ads a marketer’s only hope?”

“Take a look at our infographic as we explore the relationship between Facebook and brands. Is it the end of the Facebook free-for-all? And if so, what can we as marketers do about it?”

 
The End of the Facebook Free-For-All for Brands

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