Tag Archives: bad behavior

Beware of Ransomware!!

The term “ransom” has been around for hundreds of years and is best described as a way to redeem someone from captivity, bondage, detention, etc., by paying a demanded price.

Today, we have another destructive variation of the word ransom — that is “ransomware.” What is it and what can we do about it?

TechRepublic recently produced Ransomware: The Smart Person’s Guide, written by James Sanders. This is an executive summary quoted from the guide:

  • What is it? Ransomware is malware. The hackers demand payment, often via Bitcoin or prepaid credit card, from victims in order to regain access to an infected device and the data stored on it.
  • Why does it matter? Because of the ease of deploying ransomware, criminal organizations are increasingly relying on such attacks to generate profits.
  • Who does this affect? While home users have traditionally been the targets, healthcare and the public sector have been targeted with increasing frequency. Enterprises are more likely to have deep pockets from which to extract a ransom.
  • When is this happening? Ransomware has been an active and ongoing threat since September 2013.
  • How do I protect myself from a ransomware attack? A variety of tools developed in collaboration with law enforcement and security firms are available to decrypt your computer.

Sanders adds: “For those who have been infected, the No More Ransom project — a collaboration between Europol, the Dutch National Police, Kaspersky Lab, and Intel Security — provides decryption tools for many widespread ransomware types.

Here are a couple of informative infographics by LogRhythm:


Do Better in Your Professional Networking

If you are not heavily involved in professional networking, you are probably doing yourself — and your career — a disservice.

Consider these observations from Lindsay Kolowich, writing for HubSpot:

“When done right, networking is an incredibly valuable investment of every professional’s time and effort. It helps us make meaningful business connections, get feedback, and advance our careers. And best of all, it pays significant dividends over time. So why does it seem so unpleasant sometimes? It can feel fake, it’s exhausting, and frankly, standing alone in a sea of unknown faces with nametags and cheese plates can be utterly painful.”

According to Kolowich, here are common networking mistakes that people make:

  • “You’re waiting to build your network until you need it most.”
  • “You aren’t keeping up your personal brand.”
  • “You’re afraid to attend networking events by yourself.”
  • “You don’t follow up with personal messages.”
  • “You ask the same questions everyone else is asking.”
  • “You dominate networking conversations.”
  • You’re overeager.”
  • You don’t venture outside your existing network.”
  • “You don’t ask for anything, or you ask for too much.”

Click the image to read a lot more.


 

Part Two. An Infographic About Being Happier at Work

As we posted yesterday (“Part One. An Infographic About Being Happier in Life”), a key goal that most of us have in attending and graduating from Hofstra University and its Zarb School of Business — or otherwise being affiliated with Zarb — is to be happy in our lives. This applies to our work lives — not just our personal lives. So again, a good starting point is to ask ourselves how happy are we in our career path and in our current job? Do we understand our level of work-related happiness? What can we do to be happier at work?

According to Happify: “What do the people who are most satisfied with their jobs have in common? Learn these insider tips for being happier and more fulfilled during your 9 to 5.”

Check out the Happify infographic on happiness at work.
 

 

Part One. An Infographic About Being Happier in Life

One key goal that most of us have in attending and graduating from Hofstra University and its Zarb School of Business — or otherwise being affiliated with Zarb — is to be happy in our lives. As defined by Merriam-Webster: Happiness is “a state of well-being and contentment.” So, a good starting point is to ask ourselves how happy are we? Do we understand our level of happiness? What can we do to be happier?

According to Happify:

“If there’s one takeaway from the science of happiness, it’s this: You have the ability to control how you feel — and with consistent practice, you can form life-long habits for a more satisfying and fulfilling life.”

Happify has some interesting free activities and games to help you live a happier, more fulfilling life.

Click the Happify infographic for a larger view.
 

 

We Should ALL Be Welcome Here!

The American Express OPEN Forum has produced a valuable video, All Are Welcome Here,  based on the acceptance of diversity:

“More than 10,000 small business owners around the country are sending a message. They want their communities to know that all customers are welcome to walk through their doors regardless of religion, country of origin, or immigration status. Amanda Ballantyne of the Main Street Alliance and Elana and Danny Schwartzman, the owners of the Common Roots Café in Minneapolis, tell us about the ‘All Are Welcome Here’ campaign.”
 

 
Here is the headline of a poster prepared by the Main Street Alliance.


 

Online Retailers Often Say ‘Sale’ When It Really Isn’t

As we wrote a short time ago, companies are not always transparent or honest when they say an item is ‘on sale’ when it really is not: “Unfortunately, many retailers misuse the term ‘sale.’ And shoppers are often persuaded that a product is on sale even when it isn’t. According to Evans and Berman’s Marketing in the 21st Century: Price advertising guidelines have been set by the FTC and trade associations such as the Better Business Bureau. The FTC’s guidelines set standards of permissible conduct in these categories.”

STILL not convinced that all ‘sales’ really are sales? 

Then, consider these observations from David Streitfeld, writing for the NY Times:

“The perception of a bargain is fostered by online retailers’ use of something variously labeled list price, suggested price, reference price, or manufacturer’s suggested retail price. Whatever its name, the implication is that people are paying much more somewhere else. But with many products online, you could not pay the list price even if you wanted to. That is because hardly anyone is actually charging it. It is a sales tactic that is drawing legal scrutiny, as well as prompting questions about the integrity of E-commerce. If everyone is getting a deal, is anyone really getting a deal?”

“Here is one recent example of how retailers use list prices to motivate online buyers: Le Creuset’s iron-handle skillet, 11 ¾ inches wide and cherry in color. Amazon said that it would knock $60 off the $260 list price to sell the skillet for $200. Sounds like a bargain, the sort of deal that has helped propel Amazon to over $100 billion in annual revenue. Check around, though. The suggested price for the skillet at Williams-Sonoma.com is $285, but customers can buy it for $200. At AllModern.com, the list price is $250 but its sale price is $200. AtCutleryandMore.com, the list price is $285 and the sale price is $200. An additional 15 or so online retailers charge $200. On Le Creuset’s own site, it sells the pan for $200.”

 

Click the image to read more from the NYT.

A Le Creuset 11¾-inch skillet sold for $200 at more than a dozen Web sites, but the list prices they quoted varied. Photo Credit :Gretchen Ertl for The New York Times

 

Do Company Ethics Affect Consumer Behavior?

Do consumers really care about whether companies are ethical when they decide to patronize them? Or are other attributes (such as brand loyalty, price, convenience, assortment, etc.) so important to consumers that they ignore ethical issues when making a purchase decision?

As reported by Emarketer, Mintel and Lightspeed GMI recently conducted a large study on this topic. Companies should pay attention to and behave appropriately with regard to the findings:

“Consumers might not reward a company they believe is ethical, but many are likely to punish a company they perceive to be unethical, according to a 2015 study. Mintel and Lightspeed GMI surveyed 2,000 U.S. adult Internet users. More than half of respondents said they stop buying products when they believe a company is unethical. Over one-third of Internet users said they would tell others and 26% of respondents would do neither of those things.”

Click the chart to read more about the ethics study.