Category Archives: Earnings

Zarb ranks high.

Three Resources for Your Career Planning

As we wrap up the spring 2016 semester at the Zarb School of Business, we would like to congratulate ALL of our new graduates, our continuing students, and our alumni for a job well done!!

We’d like to offer some more career advice via these three very different types of information that should aid you in career planning:

“How much you make is a topic few people like to reveal. It’s considered impolite in many circles and it’s also fairly subjective, depending on your position and skill level, as well as gender, age, and race, among other factors.”

“To better understand where you really fall on the income scale, Creditrepair.com broke down the median income in the U.S. by education, age, race, geography and gender using Census Bureau data. How does your paycheck stack up?”

Click on the chart to see a very information-filled slideshow.

“Becoming a successful entrepreneur is no easy feat. However, just about every business owner who has created a sustainable self-employed career, will tell you that they wouldn’t have achieved their goals, without guidance from others. They’re not afraid to ask for help, take great business advice, and adjust their strategies based on insights from those who’ve done well before them.”

“Most accomplished entrepreneurs are successful in a large part, because they’ve made it a point to surround themselves with trusted advisors, mentors, and industry experts. That’s why we asked these top business leaders to share their single most impactful piece of advice for aspiring entrepreneurs.”

Click the link above to read more by Robinson and take a look at the video below.

“You’re doing everything right at work, taking all the right advice, but you’re just not moving up. Why? Susan Colantuono shares a simple, surprising piece of advice you might not have heard before quite so plainly. This talk, while aimed at an audience of women, has universal takeaways — for men and women, new grads, and mid-career workers.”


 

The Highest-Paying Companies in the U.S.

Recently, CNBC presented a slideshow based on Glassdoor data on the best-paying U.S. firms.

As Jessica Dickler reported for CNBC:

“Considering that nearly 70 percent of people said pay is among their top concerns when weighing a job, Glassdoor put together a list of the companies that offer the highest compensation, including base salary as well as commissions and bonuses. Tech firms dominated a majority of the top spots for 2016, all with total compensation over $150,000. They were closely followed by the more well-known consulting firms.”

 
Click the image to access a top ten slideshow.

 

How Well Are World Leaders Paid?

We know that senior business executives, popular celebrities, and star athletes make a lot of money. But, how do world leaders rank in terms of their compensation? And what do YOU think about this?

Here are 20 highly-paid world leaders according to 24/7 Wall St., as reported by Thomas C. Frohlich:

“In many countries, politicians frequently make more than the average citizen. This is especially true of countries’ leaders. While the size of a president’s or prime minister’s paycheck varies considerably between countries, world leaders are on the whole paid very well.”

“Though leaders’ salaries do not align perfectly with their countries’ GDP per capita, there is an interesting trend. In Singapore, which trails only Luxembourg in wealth, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong earns about $1.8 million yearly and is by far the highest paid leader. However, in Iceland, which is among the least wealthy nations of the 20 considered, Prime Minister Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson has the lowest annual salary ($133,729) of the 20 leaders.”

 
Following are the annual salaries of the twenty leaders as per 24/7 Wall Street.

  1. Lee Hsien Loong, Singapore, $1.8 million
  2. Leung Chun-ying, Hon Kong, $576,000
  3. Johann N. Schneider-Ammann, Switzerland, $460,000
  4. Barack Obama, United States, $400,000
  5. Malcolm Turnbull, Australia, $396,000
  6. Werner Faymann, Austria, $343,000
  7. Xavier Bettel, Luxembourg, $255,000
  8. Justin Trudeau, Canada, $253,000
  9. Angela Merkel, Germany, $244,000
  10. Charles Michel, Belgium, $239,000
  11. Stefan Lofven, Sweden, $235,000
  12. Lars Lokke Rasmussen, Denmark, $222,000
  13. Enda Kenny, Ireland, $209,000
  14. David Cameron, United Kingdom, $206,000
  15. Mark Rutte, Netherlands, $204,000
  16. Shinzo Abe, Japan, $203,000
  17. Francois Hollande, France, $202,000
  18. Erna Solberg, Norway, $187,000
  19. Juha Sipila, Finland, $159,000
  20. Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson, Iceland, $134,000

 

Best Jobs and Best-Paid Jobs in America: 2016

Glassdoor is an online job search firm: It has a database of “more than 8 million company reviews, CEO approval ratings, salary reportsinterview reviews and questions, benefits reviews, office photos, and more. All of this information is entirely shared by those who know a company best — the employees.”

Here are links to just a few of Glassdoor’s most valuable Web pages: 

Click the image to access Glassdoor’s research blog.


 

Product Management: A HIGHLY Rated Career Track for MBAs

One marketing career track — in product management — is gaining popularity at many MBA/MS programs (including the graduate course in product innovation and management at Hofstra’s Zarb School of Business).

Recently, Lindsay Graham — for the Wall Street Journal — wrote “Coveted Job Title for MBAs: Product Manager.” Consider this from Graham’s article:

“So much for buyout titans. The current crop of MBA students has a new dream job: Product manager. More business-school students are setting their sights on tech company product-management roles, which combine elements of marketing, design and problem-solving, students, faculty and recruiters say. Leading a product like UberEats, Uber Technologies Inc.’s food-delivery service, or Amazon Prime, home to Amazon.com Inc.’s streaming content, marries business strategy with ‘the thrill of building a thing,’ said Tom Eisenmann, a Harvard Business School professor and faculty co-chairman of the school’s Rock Center for Entrepreneurship.”

“Product managers conduct market research, propose a prototype, test it, coordinate design and engineering efforts, and market the final version. Early-career product managers can typically expect to earn in the low six-figures; the national average salary for the position is $111,650, according to job site Glassdoor Inc.

Click the image to read more of the WSJ article.

M.B.A. students Meghan Servello, left, and Rachel Flynn at Cornell Tech, Cornell University’s New York technology campus, last month. PHOTO: KHOLOOD EID FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

 

Men and Women on Same Playing Field? Credit Scores and Earnings

We know that women make up a large portion of the U.S. work force, that many women in the work force are college educated, and that many women excel in their jobs. As we noted in a post last week: “Although women executives are often paid less than their male counterparts and may have a tougher time moving up the career ladder, women executives have a lot to offer!!”

So, how do U.S. men and women fare in the credit reporting arena? And what is the true gender pay gap?

As recently reported by Jim Probasco for Investopedia:

“A recent study by Credit Sesame found that men tend to have higher credit scores than women: The average score for men was 630, while the average for women was 621. It’s not a major gap, even Credit Sesame admits. Even so, what do the results reveal about the differences between the genders when it comes to credit?” [For example,] “Credit Sesame found that the credit discrepancy gets wider with age. This discrepancy culminates at about age 65 when men tend to have a 15-point credit score advantage over women.”

“Men: More Debt But Better Records. Credit Sesame’s study showed that men carry more credit card debt than women – a fact that at first makes their better credit scores seem paradoxical. But not really, if you understand how scores are calculated. Credit scores are based, in part, on how close your expenditures have come to your credit card limit (that is, the amount you can charge on the card).”

“Fortunately, for women, the credit battle of the sexes is only one battle in a very long war. How Women Investors Make Money –- and Data Suggests Women Are Better (Behaved) Investors from a Betterment study of its clients -– point to women’s advantage in staying the course and ending up with higher returns.”

“For both sexes, the key factors to achieving and maintaining a good credit score remain prudent use of your cards (leave a healthy margin in between your balance and your credit limit) and paying all bills on time.”

 
Click the image to read more from Investopedia; and look at the infographic below the image on compensation by PayScale.


 
According to PayScale, the gender income gap may be less than reported: “Yes, men do earn more than women on average, but not that much more when they work the same job and they have similar experience and abilities.”

Do Men Really Earn More Than Women? 

Business Career Trends in 2016: A Slideshow

In the slideshow presented below, learn about many of the opportunities and challenges facing those interested in a career in a field of business.

The latest data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook are included.