Self-Branding Across Roles and Life Stages: Part 1

Recently, Zarb School of Business Distinguished Professor Joel Evans of Hofstra University did an extended radio interview with Suzanne Phillips, Psy.D. on self-branding from different perspectives and across our diverse roles. Self-branding — how we see ourselves and how we want to be perceived by others — is a key to long-term personal and career success.

In this post, we are including Part 1 of the interview, which is broken into three parts/posts.

 

  • These are some factors to consider:
    • You must have a clear sense of your self-brand.
    • What are my short-term and long-term career and personal goals?
    • How close am I to reaching these goals?
    • What specific activities must I engage in/do (in each role and life stage) to reach these goals?
    • When I set my self-brand for each role & life stage, is it perceived that way by others? Can others get beyond stereotypes? Often, others do not see us as we see ourselves.
      • If I relate this to myself, I know there are clear differences in how I view myself and how others view me – and this has evolved through my own life stages and roles undertaken.
      • Today, I am a senior citizen by virtually every definition and seen as such by some others; but I don’t see myself that way.
      • For example, as a professor, even though I am the “old guy,” I run three blogs and I’m very active in social media. So, clearly, the stereotype about seniors and social media doesn’t apply to me.
      • Also as a professor, I understand that my students today see my gray hair, wrinkles, and bald spot and do not relate to me the same way now as they did when I started teaching. To address this, I wear loud and colorful ties and socks with fun patterns (such cats’ faces), and I show a lot of videos.
      • In another recent role, as father of the bride, my friends and family saw another side of me. But it was the other side that I wanted them to see.
    • Authenticity is imperative for a self-brand to be perceived as desired by others. Faking won’t cut it.

 

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