Don’t Fall into the Imposter Syndrome Trap

Earlier this week, we published a post titled  “Be in Charge of Your Own Self Brand; Don’t Let Others Define You”: “Just be persistent and confident in your abilities, work hard, and learn as much as you can about every facet of your life! This is about YOU being the master of your own self-brand, and not having others define you instead.”

This post focuses on another self-esteem/self-brand trap that we do NOT want to fall into known as the “imposter syndrome.” This syndrome could occur at any stage in one’s career or life.  As Brianna Ruffin reports for the Center for Communication:

“Coined by clinical psychologists Dr. Pauline Clance and Suzanne Imes in 1978, imposter syndrome refers to a high-achieving person’s fear of failure and lack of faith in their own abilities. In college, this manifests itself as students believing their past achievements mean nothing compared to those of other students. You might look at a classmate who was valedictorian and head of the student council, who also participated in three sports and think to yourself, ‘I don’t deserve to be here.’ This can be especially true for first-generation, low-income, and/or racial minority students, but anyone can look at this imaginary high bar and experience impostor syndrome.”

“Thankfully, a few small changes to your everyday life can lessen or completely eliminate the syndrome’s chronic effects. Many people deal with this sensitive issue in different ways, but the following steps should help you identify situations where you experience feeling like an imposter and take back control.”

Here are six specific tips from Ruffin: 

  1. RECOGNIZE THAT YOU DESERVE TO BE HERE
  2. TAKE PRIDE IN YOUR BACKGROUND
  3. STOP COMPARING YOURSELF TO OTHER PEOPLE
  4. DON’T BE AFRAID TO ASK FOR HELP!
  5. TALK ABOUT YOUR FEELINGS WITH YOUR FRIENDS
  6. KNOW THAT YOU’RE NOT ALONE

To learn more about each of the above steps, click on the image below.

 

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