Women Executives: Strong Performers

Although women executives are often paid less than their male counterparts and may have a tougher time moving up the career ladder, women executives have a lot to offer!!

Consider women executives in technology, as reported by David Wagner for InformationWeek:

“Increasing gender diversity in technology companies has been considered an ongoing challenge by many, and now a recent study by the Peterson Institute for International Economics and sponsored by EY (formerly Ernst and Young) shows that it isn’t just a social justice issue, but a matter of economics. The study found that companies with women in executive leadership roles can see substantially better profits, and offered some insight into a few practical ways that tech companies and CIOs can improve gender diversity to see increased performance.”

“The study looked at 21,980 publicly traded companies from 91 different countries in 2014 to determine the number of women in CEO roles, C-level positions, and on the board of directors. It found that across the study, nearly 60% of companies had no female board members, and nearly 50% had no female executives. Fewer than 5% had female CEOs. It also found that tech companies had one of the lowest rates of female executives by industry, with only energy and industrial companies having a lower rates.”

“The study found no statistical evidence of female CEOs performing better or worse than male CEOs, and it only found minor connections between female board members and better performance. However, the study found very robust connections between female executives and profitability. It found that for profitable firms, going from no female leaders to 30% was associated with a 15% rise in profitability.”

And take a look at this YouTube video featuring Carol CalaVice-President, Energy, Environment, Safety & Health at Lockheed Martin Corp.


 

2 thoughts on “Women Executives: Strong Performers

  1. Pingback: Men and Women on Same Playing Field? Credit Scores and Earnings | Zarb Means Business

  2. Pingback: Gender and Credit & Earnings: Is It a Level Playing Field? | Evans on Marketing

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